15 reasons why: Donald Trump’s supporters will never abandon him | Salon.com

Most journalists still don’t get it: Republicans will never abandon Donald Trump, and he’s the 2020 frontrunner
— Read on www.salon.com/amp/15-reasons-why-donald-trumps-supporters-will-never-abandon-him

The return of mind control. Find the gaps in their minds and don’t mend them! Widen them!

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Governor Peter Obi’s nuggets

This was so interesting that i just had to share.

Mr Peter Obi is Currently Trending On Nigerian Media Space After he appeared on Channels Television Breakfast Show – InfoEast

He debated a professor of economics in University Of Abuja and laid out solid points which earned him admiration and praises all over Nigerian media space.

Here are 10 quotes from his debate on channels.

1. “ If a man has not created wealth. He cannot manage wealth “

2. “Unemployment is worsening. In 2017 our unemployment ratio moved from 14.8% to 18.8% this year. This means that more people have lost their jobs. We can’t survive like this “

3 “You are borrowing money and the issue it was supposed to affect is not coming down. Poverty is increasing , children out of school moved from 10 million to 12 million. “

4. “ I remember Ngozi Okonjo Iweala crying everyday. Begging Us to save this monies for the rainy day. All the Governors disagreed. They said let us share it. Now we are borrowing to feed.”

5 “ All I Know is that Governance has nothing to do with age. Today the Youngest Governor in Nigeria is an Unmitigated disaster”

6. “ In a State in the North the number of children that sat for WAEC is 128. This state has about 5 million people. This is not acceptable “

7. “ I don’t have any single property in this country outside Onitsha. If you see any property outside Onitsha and they say it belongs to Mr Peter Obi. Burn it! “

8. “ When you are borrowing for consumption. It gets to a stage when you cannot control it”

9. “ Nigerians cannot aim for sky scrapers when we cannot maintain simple toilets “

10. “ I cannot pay 250,000 for one night in a hotel. I wouldn’t sleep that night. I will feel like I have been robbed. “

Dialogue With Africa Board Fellows: Navigating Challenging Macroeconomic Environments

Center for Financial Inclusion Blog

30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of a blog series spotlighting the perspectives and experiences of CEOs and board members of financial institutions, as well as industry experts, who have participated in CFI’s Africa Board Fellowship program.

Africa Board Fellowship graphic harvest illustrationBy Danielle Piskadlo, Director, CFI

In recent years, some African countries have experienced slower economic growth and less stability in their currencies. This deterioration in macroeconomic conditions has presented challenges for financial service providers (FSPs) seeking to serve the base of the pyramid and improve financial inclusion. Some ways macroeconomic conditions impact FSPs include:

  • Higher operational expenses (e.g., imported IT equipment and software; office leases and technical services invoiced in foreign currency)
  • Increase in non-performing loans as small businesses have had fewer growth opportunities
  • Higher cost of funds (both deposits and debt)
  • Reduced access to debt from international and local providers
  • Decrease in revenue or tighter margins

We’re talking to Africa Board Fellowship (ABF) alumni…

View original post 692 more words

Navigating Challenges Is What Boards Are All About – Part 2: Vulnerability and Resilience

Center for Financial Inclusion Blog

Strong board leadership can help reduce a financial service provider’s vulnerability to external shocks and enhance its resilience.

> Posted by Paul DiLeo, Founder and Managing Director of Grassroots Capital Management and Governance Expert for the Africa Board Fellows Program

30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of an Africa Board Fellowship blog series spotlighting the experiences of participants and reflections from industry experts.

In the previous blog in this series, we reframed external challenges as a “normal” part of doing business for financial service providers (FSPs) targeting the base of the pyramid. And based on insights from Africa Board Fellows, we looked at specific ways board members can anticipate and even shape the challenging aspects of their operating environment. However, while most boards have more potential for external influence than they often exercise, there are always external factors that cannot be controlled. Boards must also continually focus on reducing the…

View original post 816 more words

Navigating Challenges Is What Boards Are All About – Part 1: Anticipating Challenges

Center for Financial Inclusion Blog

Strong FSP boards prepare for and respond to external shocks as a rule, not an exception.

30784872334_b499dfc281_mThe following is part of a blog series spotlighting the perspectives and experiences of CEOs and board members of financial institutions, as well as industry experts, who have participated in CFI’s Africa Board Fellowship program.

> Posted by Paul DiLeo, Founder and Managing Director of Grassroots Capital Management and Governance Expert for the Africa Board Fellows Program

Far from being “extraordinary and rare,” challenging environments are a “normal” part of business for financial service providers (FSPs) targeting low-income populations. We tend to think that external environment challenges are extraordinary events that cannot be predicted or are too varied and diverse to prepare for—and therefore are best confronted as they arise. What do currency devaluations, deteriorating security, political interference or regulatory upheavals have in common? Can we can plan for them all and prepare effective…

View original post 843 more words

A season of break ups, break downs and break dance

Nothing is as inevitable as a disaster whose time has come”! I do grave injustice to Victor Hugo but this tweaking of his deep and enduring observation, (also referred to as Tussman’s law) captures the disaster that was bound inevitably to befall the APC given its specialised capacity to promise, its amazing indifference to human suffering, its display of hypocrisy, and its impotence and sterility when it came to delivery.

Aspects of this debacle from the brush of cartoonists.

Saraki’s departure speech

BREAKING NEWS NUGGET- PRESS STATEMENT BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE, HIS EXCELLENCY, DR. ABUBAKAR BUKOLA SARAKI, CON, ON 31ST JULY, 2018.

I wish to inform Nigerians that, after extensive consultations, I have decided to take my leave of the All Progressives Congress (APC).

This is not a decision that I have made lightly. If anything at all, I have tarried for so long and did all that was humanly possible, even in the face of great provocation, ridicule and flagrant persecution, to give opportunity for peace, reconciliation and harmonious existence.

Perhaps, more significantly, I am mindful of the fact that I carry on my shoulder a great responsibility for thousands of my supporters, political associates and friends, who have trusted in my leadership and have attached their political fortunes to mine. However, it is after an extensive consultation with all the important stakeholders that we have come to this difficult but inevitable decision to pitch our political tent elsewhere; where we could enjoy greater sense of belonging and where the interests of the greatest number of our Nigerians would be best served.

While I take full responsibility for this decision, I will like to emphasise that it is a decision that has been inescapably imposed on me by certain elements and forces within the APC who have ensured that the minimum conditions for peace, cooperation, inclusion and a general sense of belonging did not exist.

They have done everything to ensure that the basic rules of party administration, which should promote harmonious relations among the various elements within the party were blatantly disregarded. All governance principles which were required for a healthy functioning of the party and the government were deliberately violated or undermined. And all entreaties for justice, equity and fairness as basic precondition for peace and unity, not only within the party, but also the country at large, were simply ignored, or employed as additional pretext for further exclusion.

The experience of my people and associates in the past three years is that they have suffered alienation and have been treated as outsiders in their own party. Thus, many have become disaffected and disenchanted. At the same time, opportunities to seek redress and correct these anomalies were deliberately blocked as a government-within-a-government had formed an impregnable wall and left in the cold, everyone else who was not recognized as “one of us”. This is why my people, like all self-respecting people would do, decided to seek accommodation elsewhere.

I have had the privilege to lead the Nigerian legislature in the past three years as the President of the Senate and the Chairman of the National Assembly. The framers of our constitution envisage a degree of benign tension among the three arms of government if the principle of checks and balances must continue to serve as the building block of our democracy. In my role as the head of the legislature, and a leader of the party, I have ensured that this necessary tension did not escalate at any time in such a way that it could encumber Executive function or correspondingly, undermine the independence of the legislature. Over the years, I have made great efforts in the overall interest of the country, and in spite of my personal predicament, to manage situations that would otherwise have resulted in unsavoury consequences for the government and the administration. My colleagues in the Senate will bear testimony to this.

However, what we have seen is a situation whereby every dissent from the legislature was framed as an affront on the executive or as part of an agenda to undermine the government itself. The populist notion of anti-corruption became a ready weapon for silencing any form of dissent and for framing even principled objection as “corruption fighting back”. Persistent onslaught against the legislature and open incitement of the people against their own representatives became a default argument in defence of any short-coming of the government in a manner that betrays all too easily, a certain contempt for the Constitution itself or even the democracy that it is meant to serve.

Unfortunately, the self-serving gulf that has been created between the leadership of the two critical arms of government based on distrust and mutual suspicion has made any form of constructive engagement impossible. Therefore, anything short of a slavish surrender in a way that reduces the legislature to a mere rubber stamp would not have been sufficient in procuring the kind of rapprochement that was desired in the interest of all. But I have no doubt in my mind, that to surrender this way is to be complicit in the subversion of the institution that remains the very bastion of our democracy. I am a democrat. And I believe that anyone who lays even the most basic claim to being a democrat will not accept peace on those terms; which seeks to compromise the very basis of our existence as the parliament of the people.

The recent weeks have witnessed a rather unusual attempts to engage with some of these most critical issues at stake. Unfortunately, the discord has been allowed to fester unaddressed for too long, with dire consequences for the ultimate objective of delivering the common good and achieving peace and unity in our country. Any hope of reconciliation at this point was therefore very slim indeed. Most of the horses had bolted from the stable.

The emergence of a new national party executives a few weeks ago held out some hopes, however slender. The new party chairman has swung into action and did his best alongside some of the Governors of APC and His Excellency, the Vice President. I thank them for all their great efforts to save the day and achieve reconciliation. Even though I thought these efforts were coming late in the day, but seeing the genuine commitment of these gentlemen, I began to think that perhaps it was still possible to reconsider the situation.

However, as I have realized all along, there are some others in the party leadership hierarchy, who did not think dialogue was the way forward and therefore chose to play the fifth columnists. These individuals went to work and ensured that they scuttled the great efforts and the good intentions of these aforementioned leaders of the party. Perhaps, had these divisive forces not thrown the cogs in the wheel at the last minutes, and in a manner that made it impossible to sustain any trust in the process, the story today would have been different.

For me, I leave all that behind me. Today, I start as I return to the party where I began my political journey, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP).

When we left the PDP to join the then nascent coalition of All Progressives Congress (APC) in 2014, we left in a quest for justice, equity and inclusion; the fundamental principles on which the PDP was originally built but which it had deviated from. We were attracted to the APC by its promise of change. We fought hard along with others and defeated the PDP.

In retrospect, it is now evident that the PDP has learnt more from its defeat than the APC has learnt from its victory. The PDP that we return to is now a party that has learnt its lessons the hard way and have realized that no member of the party should be taken for granted; a party that has realized that inclusion, justice and equity are basic precondition for peace; a party that has realized that never again can the people of Nigeria be taken for granted.

I am excited by the new efforts, which seeks to build the reborn PDP on the core principles of promoting democratic values; internal democracy; accountability; inclusion and national competitiveness; genuine commitment to restructuring and devolution of powers; and an abiding belief in zoning of political and elective offices as an inevitable strategy for managing our rich diversity as a people of one great indivisible nation called Nigeria.

What we have all agreed is that a deep commitment to these ideals were not only a demonstration of our patriotism but also a matter of enlightened self-interest, believing that our very survival as political elites of this country will depend on our ability to earn the trust of our people and in making them believe that, more than anything else, we are committed to serving the people.

What the experience of the last three years have taught us is that the most important task that we face as a country is how to reunite our people. Never before had so many people in so many parts of our country felt so alienated from their Nigerianness. Therefore, we understand that the greatest task before us is to reunite the county and give everyone a sense of belonging regardless of region or religion.

Every Nigerian must have an instinctive confidence that he or she will be treated with justice and equity in any part of the country regardless of the language they speak or how they worship God. This is the great task that trumps all. Unless we are able to achieve this, all other claim to progress no matter how defined, would remain unsustainable.

This is the task that I am committing myself to and I believe that it is in this PDP, that I will have the opportunity to play my part. It is my hope that the APC will respect the choice that I have made as my democratic right, and understand that even though we will now occupy a different political space, we do not necessarily become enemies unto one another.

Thank you.

Dr. Abubakar Bukola Saraki, CON
President of the Senate