Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

We are all wailers

By

Noel Ihebuzor

We are all wailers.

Some wail because their ticket lost. Some wail because a man was chased out of power by a conspiracy drawn up by strange bedfellows each fellow pursuing agendas that had nothing to do with national interests.

Some others wail, largely in silence and within, because they were deceived. They were deceived by smoke peddling spinners who sold them a three sound-byte election campaign of security, employment and fighting corruption, sound-bytes which their principal would forget at inconvenient moments during the campaigns, but like folks bewitched, folks under a spell, they failed to or refused to notice. And now they wail, deceived hunters who voluntarily gave away their semi functional Dane guns for non-functional blunted and rusted knives without handles.

We wail because the man we want to hail, the man we set up to hail, the man we set out to hail is failing so dramatically, has failed so dramatically and continues to do so in acts of omission and acts of commission, in appointments that disappoint all save a narrow cabal, in selective acts that are deficient in nobility, poor in conception, but rich in meanness and mostly driven by revenge and spite.

And our pride will not let us own up to these facts.

So we mourn internally, and frustrated as we are, we manifest our frustration as misdirected aggression on any one bold enough to speak the truth we hide from.

Misplaced loyalty traps us and shields us from the truth. It prevents us from owning up that we were wrong, yes, wrong in the choices we made, that we were foolish and deliberately dishonest in the lies we told and sold,

Foolish pride stands between us and genuine contrition, and instead of contrition, we spend our energies rationalizing incompetence, finding lame excuses for lame and limited competence. Our intellect is turned towards a perfection of a puerile blame game, a game that is now lacking in conviction and which is becoming very unproductive with each passing day. The groves of the blame game disc have now worn thin, its content is now shallow, our lies hollow before our eyes, sorrow eats us up, both from within and without.

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Of Decampees, Self Internally Displaced Politicians (SIDPs) and the party of “righteous”

The claims below require some fact checking (Rochas was initially elected on an APGA platform, for instance). If the claims are true in a number of instances, then we have good enough proof that most of our politicians are persons of doubtful honour for whom words like principle and integrity have no meaning.

NI

WHO ACTUALLY LOOTED NIGERIA FOR 16 YEARS?

Out of 24 APC governors today, 22 of them were members of the PDP that ruled for 16 years.

As if that is not enough 20 former PDP governors are now in APC and many of them with corruption cases, but PMB’s corruption fight “no reach their side.”

Do you also know that:
1. The first and current APC Senate President was in PDP?

2. The first APC Speaker of the House of Representatives was also in PDP?

3. Three out of five former Speakers of the House of Representatives under PDP are now in APC?

3. A former PDP senate president is also in APC?

4. Two former national Chairmen of PDP are also now in APC?

5. Thousands of current APC legislators at both state and national levels were in PDP?

6. Hundreds of current APC ministers and commissioners today were in PDP?

7. Thousands of other former PDP leaders and members including former ministers, legislators, commissioners, etc are now in APC?

Now who are the PDP members that APC keeps referring to that looted the nation’s treasury for sixteen years?

Current APC Governors that Migrated from PDP:

1. Governor Ibikunle Amosun of Ogun State was a PDP Senator.

2. Governor Nasir El-Rufai of Kaduna State served as FCT minister under the PDP.

3. Governor Aminu Masari of Kastina State was a Former House of Representatives speaker under the PDP.

4. Governor Abubakar Bello of Niger State was a PDP Former Commissioner.

5. Governor Aminu Tambuwal of Sokoto was a Former PDP Speaker of the House of Representatives.

6. Governor Abdulfatah Ahmed of Kwara State was a Commissioner and Governor under PDP.

7. Governor Badaru Abubakar of Jigawa State was in PDP.

8. Governor Simon Lalong of Plateau state was also in PDP.

9. Abdullahi Ganduje of Kano State was in PDP.

10. Governor Samuel Orthom of Benue State was a PDP Minister.

11. Governor Tanko Al-Makura of Nasarawa State was in PDP.

12. Governor Abubakar Bagudu of Kebbi State was a Former PDP Senator.

13. Governor Bindow Jubrilla of Adamawa State was a Former PDP Senator.

14. Governor Rochas Okorocha of Imo State was in PDP.

Former PDP Governors now in APC:
1. Aliyu Wammako -Sokoto
2. Rabiu Kwankwaso- Kano
3. Sai’du Dakingari -Kebbi
4 , Bukola Saraki – Kwara
5. Murtal Nyako- Adamawa
6. Rotimi Amaechi -Rivers
7. Temiprye Sylva – Bayelsa
8 . Sullivan Chime- Enugu
9. Obong Victor Attah- Akwa-Ibom
10. Chris Ngige – Anambra
11. Joshua Dariye -Plateau
12. George Akume -Benue
13. Adamu Abdullahi – Nasarawa
14. Orji Uzor Kalu- Abia
15. Oserheimen Osunbor- Edo
16. Segun Oni -Ekiti
17. Alao Akala- Oyo
18. Danjuma Goje- Gombe
19. Olagunsoye Oyinlola -Osun
20. Garba Umar- Taraba

Anybody who says PDP members looted the nation’s treasury and are therefore corrupt is distorting the facts and therefore a shameless / barefaced liar, innately corrupt, fraudulent, self-centred, deceptive, wicked, broad day robber, oppressive and has no decency and humanity in them.

Are these the kind of people that should rule a nation?

Copied

Of Decampees, Self Internally Displaced Politicians (SIDPs) and the party of “righteous”

The claims below require some fact checking (Rochas was initially elected on an APGA platform, for instance). If the claims are true in a number of instances, then we have good enough proof that most of our politicians are persons of doubtful honour for whom words like principle and integrity have no meaning.

NI

WHO ACTUALLY LOOTED NIGERIA FOR 16 YEARS?

Out of 24 APC governors today, 22 of them were members of the PDP that ruled for 16 years.

As if that is not enough 20 former PDP governors are now in APC and many of them with corruption cases, but PMB’s corruption fight “no reach their side.”

Do you also know that:
1. The first and current APC Senate President was in PDP?

2. The first APC Speaker of the House of Representatives was also in PDP?

3. Three out of five former Speakers of the House of Representatives under PDP are now in APC?

3. A former PDP senate president is also in APC?

4. Two former national Chairmen of PDP are also now in APC?

5. Thousands of current APC legislators at both state and national levels were in PDP?

6. Hundreds of current APC ministers and commissioners today were in PDP?

7. Thousands of other former PDP leaders and members including former ministers, legislators, commissioners, etc are now in APC?

Now who are the PDP members that APC keeps referring to that looted the nation’s treasury for sixteen years?

Current APC Governors that Migrated from PDP:

1. Governor Ibikunle Amosun of Ogun State was a PDP Senator.

2. Governor Nasir El-Rufai of Kaduna State served as FCT minister under the PDP.

3. Governor Aminu Masari of Kastina State was a Former House of Representatives speaker under the PDP.

4. Governor Abubakar Bello of Niger State was a PDP Former Commissioner.

5. Governor Aminu Tambuwal of Sokoto was a Former PDP Speaker of the House of Representatives.

6. Governor Abdulfatah Ahmed of Kwara State was a Commissioner and Governor under PDP.

7. Governor Badaru Abubakar of Jigawa State was in PDP.

8. Governor Simon Lalong of Plateau state was also in PDP.

9. Abdullahi Ganduje of Kano State was in PDP.

10. Governor Samuel Orthom of Benue State was a PDP Minister.

11. Governor Tanko Al-Makura of Nasarawa State was in PDP.

12. Governor Abubakar Bagudu of Kebbi State was a Former PDP Senator.

13. Governor Bindow Jubrilla of Adamawa State was a Former PDP Senator.

14. Governor Rochas Okorocha of Imo State was in PDP.

Former PDP Governors now in APC:
1. Aliyu Wammako -Sokoto
2. Rabiu Kwankwaso- Kano
3. Sai’du Dakingari -Kebbi
4 , Bukola Saraki – Kwara
5. Murtal Nyako- Adamawa
6. Rotimi Amaechi -Rivers
7. Temiprye Sylva – Bayelsa
8 . Sullivan Chime- Enugu
9. Obong Victor Attah- Akwa-Ibom
10. Chris Ngige – Anambra
11. Joshua Dariye -Plateau
12. George Akume -Benue
13. Adamu Abdullahi – Nasarawa
14. Orji Uzor Kalu- Abia
15. Oserheimen Osunbor- Edo
16. Segun Oni -Ekiti
17. Alao Akala- Oyo
18. Danjuma Goje- Gombe
19. Olagunsoye Oyinlola -Osun
20. Garba Umar- Taraba

Anybody who says PDP members looted the nation’s treasury and are therefore corrupt is distorting the facts and therefore a shameless / barefaced liar, innately corrupt, fraudulent, self-centred, deceptive, wicked, broad day robber, oppressive and has no decency and humanity in them.

Are these the kind of people that should rule a nation?

Copied

Diversion and distraction as defence – but they won’t work this time.

WHY IS THE PDP SILENT ON THE CAMBRIDGE ANALYTICA HACKING OF BUHARI’S 2015 PERSONAL DATA? – http://signaturetv.com.ng/2018/03/24/why-is-the-pdp-silent-on-the-cambridge-analytica-hacking-of-buharis-2015-personal-data/

Karma, Poetic Justice and GMB

Reproduced as received

DAPCHI 110: THE TRAGEDY OF A NATION

By Dr. Reuben Abati

Karma is a bitch. Poetic justice is a bastard. Both have combined to wrong-foot the incumbent Buhari administration to make it look like a big mistake and an act of misjudgment by the Nigerian electorate. If Buhari had been disallowed from taking power in 2015, and those who advised President Goodluck Jonathan not to give a damn had their way, and Jonathan had remained in power and all the current problems had surfaced, it would have been said by Nigerians that Goodluck Jonathan truncated Nigeria’s destiny.

In 2015, the refrain, which was reaffirmed recently by those who authored it, was that Nigeria could only move forward with anybody but Jonathan. If Buhari was prevented from taking over power, Nigerians would have been very aggressive towards the Jonathan administration. It would have been said that the messiah was robbed of victory. It would have been argued that the man who would have saved Nigeria was prevented from doing so. It might have even been argued that under General Buhari, Nigeria could have become the greatest country on the surface of the earth.

Such was the impact of the propaganda. Such was the nature of the politics of the time. The Buharideens would never have allowed a post-2015 Jonathan government to work. Even if it did, the opposition would have imagined a greater possibility. But here we are, three years down the line: the messianic propaganda has failed. Their Saviour is not the Jesus Christ they imagined him to be. The country remains unsaved. Their promise of change has been no more than scaremongering. When the question is asked: are you better today than you were three years ago?, no ordinary Nigerian can answer that question positively: change has brought him or her nothing but agony and anguish.

Should they offer an answer, it would be a response marked by regret. The biggest tragedy that has occurred therefore is the demystification, the unmasking, the unveiling of a man who was thought to be a god but who has since danced naked and is dancing naked in the market-place. Strikingly, the Emperor is without clothes. Some of the most vociferous critics of old have also been exposed. Nasir el-Rufai deployed all the heights of his intelligence to demonise the Jonathan government on social media. No one else has been able to match the quality of his vitriol. Today, the same Nasir is busy demolishing the houses of anyone who dares to make a negative comment about him, or he takes them to court and threatens them with Armageddon. The same rights that he demanded for the Nigerian people, he now tramples upon.

There was also our beloved kinsman, Alhaji Lai Mohammed. He was the scourge of the Jonathan administration. He could issue five anti-establishment press statements in a day. There has been no one like him in Nigerian history doing the job of opposition spokesman. He was ruthlessly efficient. Nobody in the current opposition parties has demonstrated his capacity as an opposition figure, in part because all the opposition spokesmen have been harassed, blackmailed, dehumanized, and intimidated, but called to do the job, on the other side of the fence as Minister of Information, Alhaji Mohammed remains a study in self-contradiction. His five minutes of fame in the Nigerian political sphere has since ended.

He used to be creative and dynamic, but now faced with the challenges of the real thing, the only thing that comes out of his mouth is the dumb argument that Goodluck Jonathan is the source of all the problems of Nigeria or similar inanities. When the matter is not so phrased, we are told that the Jonathan administration stole the country blind. And yet whereas the government of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) borrowed the sum of N6 trillion over a period of 16 years, the APC government has borrowed more than N11 trillion in 3 years! Is it possible all the oil wells have dried up and Nigeria no longer makes money? What has happened to the country’s revenue stream? The absurdity of the situation is further explained by the fact that when a gas cylinder malfunctions in the house of an APC member or there is a crisis in their other room, the man that is blamed is Goodluck Jonathan or the previous administration. They defend the impossible and the unintelligible. But that trick is no longer working. The other tragedy of the Buhari administration is how it has allowed itself to get involved in a Nigerian version of the popular “one-corner-dance”, a downward, self-denigrating choreographic exertion. The result is that right now, people have now moved from the anything but Jonathan corner to the anything but Buhari corner in Nigerian politics. Karma is a bitch. Poetic justice is a bastard.

Nothing illustrates this better than the title of this essay, the entry into which has been deliberately delayed, to prepare a setting and a mood for the crisis that Nigeria faces. One of the reasons the Nigerian electorate voted out the previous administration was because of its perceived inability to rescue the abducted Chibok girls. There was an international outcry about this. Bring Back the Chibok girls even became the most popular hashtag on international social media, and Jonathan, who had also signed the anti-same-sex bill into law became a villain in the eyes of the international community. The various interested forces, local and global joined hands together to pull down his government.

During the 2015 political campaigns, General Muhammadu Buhari was packaged as a morally upright statesman who would put an end to the impunity of the insurgents and terrorists. Jonathan was considered weak. Buhari was regarded as strong. And so on and so forth- let me just put it like that in order not to be accused of comparison given my own antecedents. But here is where the rub lies: President Buhari has failed the people in their expectations. He has frittered away their goodwill.

He promised Nigerians that Boko Haram will be defeated, and somewhere down the line, we were told the Boko Haram had in fact been “technically defeated.” The President even received a captured flag of the insurgents, together with the personal Quoran of Ibrahim Shekau, the leader of the group. Today, the Boko Haram gang continues to show that they have not been defeated. The Federal Government negotiated with these same insurgents and gave them money to secure the release of over 100 girls, some Boko Haram leaders were released, but the other Monday, Boko Haram abducted over 100 girls in Dapchi in Yobe state. This is sad and tragic. Whatever the government may have gained has been lost. The girls that have been released have been replaced. The fight against Boko Haram is back to square one.

The clay feet of those who thought they knew better than everyone else has thus been exposed. For President Buhari, this must be a personal tragedy. His strongest promoters indeed believed that under his watch, the problem of insecurity will be solved. But under him, more money has been spent on national security, with poor results, and the security situation has only worsened. The previous government had the Boko Haram to deal with, this government has its cup full: the herdsmen-farmers conflict, the low level insurgency in the Niger Delta, the crisis of self-determination in the Eastern region, the nationwide proliferation of small arms and ammunition, the notorious Boko Haram and the angst of a disappointed public. On all fronts, the government is found wanting.

Yes, it has been found wanting and in a suspicious manner too. It is in fact curious that security forces were withdrawn in volatile areas of Benue state, just a week before the criminal herdsmen struck. Who ordered that withdrawal? The Inspector-General of Police has also reportedly withdrawn the Special Forces sent to secure the same areas. The Benue Governor, Samuel Ortom is so incensed he is now saying he is willing and ready to pay the supreme sacrifice for his people. In Yobe state, soldiers were also withdrawn from high-risk areas just before the Dapchi 110 were abducted. The military has since defended itself. It has no capacity its spokesman says, to protect all schools in the Northern part of the country. And we can’t blame the military, can we? It is a sign of the calamity that the country faces that soldiers are the ones now protecting virtually every inch of the Nigerian space, internally and externally. Our soldiers are tired and overstretched, over-used and over-abused. The police are also similarly overwhelmed. It has never been this bad. Fact: the government of the day has been humbled. I once argued that Nigeria is a very difficult country to govern but when you claim to know it all, you are bound to face the contradictions. Every problem solved generates other problems.

People choose their governments and leaders because they believe they can lead and protect them. When that trust is betrayed, the legitimacy of the government is in question. In more than 20 states, salaries have not been paid for months. And it is a stupid point to say that the previous government stole all the money. How about all the money that has been earned and borrowed since then? Missing? What is responsible really for this drift, this cluelessness, this self-abuse, from a know-it-all team that took over Nigeria in 2015? My other concern is that beyond all the propaganda and the hypocrisy and blackmail, President Buhari’s team may not really love him at all; they may in fact have truly, set him up for his downfall. Buhari’s biggest stake is the legacy he leaves behind. The little I see of that legacy is not good at all. I once published a piece in which I alleged that Nigerians had hopped into a one-chance bus; I want to modify that and add that it is actually President Buhari who boarded a one-chance bus, and for that he has my heartfelt sympathy. Whatever bus brought him to power is a one-chance bus.

What has happened so far merely vindicates the Olusegun Obasanjo and Oby Ezekwesili groups. The former is asking for a Third Force, a Coalition of powers and forces. The other is wielding a Red Card. Both are united in this regard: they consider the two political parties that have ruled Nigeria since 1999, useless and ineffectual. They want a new dawn for Nigeria. They want a discontinuity of hypocrisy and opportunism. They acknowledge one significant point: that Nigeria has remained at one spot. Nothing has changed, the change agenda has failed, everything remains the same. Whether these groups are able to achieve, or motivate the real change the people desire is another matter, but the honesty with which they have reversed themselves is telling, and good for our democracy. You need not raise the point that both Obasanjo and Ezekwesili belong to the same elite that they now repudiate.

I sympathise with the parents of the Dapchi 110. It is sad that their only hope is in God, and the possibility of a miracle. Students get killed in the United States, due to gun possession issues in a psychotic society, but to send a child to school and have him or her abducted by terrorists is the grievous pain ever possible in Nigeria. What is clear is that the Nigerian leadership elite has failed the people. This is not a political party matter; it is about capacity, political will, leadership and commitment. This is probably why a body of opinion has developed to the effect that the two major political parties in the country – the ruling All Progressives Congress (APC) and the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) have both failed the country. But can extant or any political parties, in their present shape, save Nigeria? I doubt, and that is my thoroughly non-partisan opinion.

The political party system in Nigeria has to be rebuilt, reformed and reconstructed. Beyond that, we need a new crop of leaders. The solution may not lie with Obasanjo or Ezekwesili or the Nigeria Intervention Movement but they have thrown up ideas about the national dilemma that cannot be ignored. Such ideas cannot be ignored because the biggest victims are not the ten per-centers or the men and women in high places who succeed not through talent or excellence, but mere opportunistic “faith”; the victims are young Nigerians, the same people we call the leaders of tomorrow – that tomorrow is already postponed, because that generation of the future is led by analogue leaders whose glory is trapped in the past. Nigeria needs to rescue tomorrow from the past and the present.

Nigeria needs fresh energy, new ideas and a leadership revolution. Wherever they may be, may God protect the Dapchi 110, who have been failed by the Nigerian state. If Buhari rescues them, he may well succeed in rescuing his government a little from the devastating and ruthless onslaught of poetic justice.

Fighting “kwarapshan” with style – this is how we roll – Buhari’s allegiances as always negotiable and corruptible…. . .. Now this is a punch to the belly…

Excerpted from the Punch

Punch EDITORIAL
Buhari’s scandalous recall of NHIS boss

IN a baffling move, President Muhammadu Buhari demonstrated clannishness and lack of respect for procedure once more by reinstating the Executive Secretary of the National Health Insurance Scheme, Usman Yusuf. Yusuf was suspended in July 2017 following serious allegations of corruption reported to the Minister of Health, Isaac Adewole, and is being investigated by both the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission and the Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Related Offences Commission. The premature recall sits uneasily with Buhari’s commitment to openness and transparency.

Yusuf, who was appointed in 2016, allegedly cornered N919 million, being part of the contributions of the subscribers to the scheme. He claimed that some of the amount was expended on the training of the NHIS staff. He allegedly bought a Sport Utility Vehicle for N58 million, approved contracts worth about N1 billion for his cronies and filled the organisation with his relatives. The Senate also accused Yusuf of “corrupt expenditure of N292 million…without recourse to any appropriate approving authority.” Rightly, Adewole suspended him from his duty post, and empanelled a committee to investigate him, which is in accordance with extant Federal Civil Service rules.

However, claiming that the minister had no power to suspend him, Yusuf said in his response: “With due respect, sir, I am unable to comply with your directive.” He claimed that only the President had the power to suspend or sack him. But the Health Ministry insisted that the NHIS is an agency under its supervision and reaffirmed Yusuf’s suspension from office. But Yusuf refused to appear before the committee set up to investigate him. The ministerial committee’s report on the case was reportedly submitted to Buhari last September.

Instructively, both the EFCC and ICPC stepped into Yusuf’s case. But rather than follow due process, Buhari, through a letter from his Chief of Staff, Abba Kyari, reinstated Yusuf. According to a report, the President informed the minister of Yusuf’s recall, adding that he (Yusuf) had been “admonished to work harmoniously with the minister.” The minister has reportedly confirmed Yusuf’s recall: “Yes, what you have heard is true.”

The recall is shocking and outrageous, squared and cubed. It has, once again, revealed Buhari’s true colours. Unfamiliar with the nuances of modern governance and insular to the point of self-entrapment in primitive provincialism, he does not give a hoot about the consequences of some of his missteps. The to-hell-with-you attitude that played out in his notorious admonition to survivors of Fulani herdsmen massacres in Benue State to “learn to accommodate” their tormentors is on display here again in the memo asking Yusuf to “work harmoniously with the minister.”

The incident raises larger questions about Buhari’s stand on corruption and discipline: is this how to fight corruption? Is this good governance in the face of so much moral rot in the land, which Buhari vowed to fight if he was elected? Corruption is defined most comprehensively by Transparency International as an abuse of entrusted power for private gain. Have both the EFCC and the ICPC cleared Yusuf of corruption allegations? Even if they did, should the decision and memo for his recall come from the Presidency or from the supervising ministry that suspended him, in the first instance? The recall is a slap in the face for the minister. This is unequivocally awful. Henceforth, any official with connections to the “right” ethnic group or to the Presidency may feel emboldened to break the rules and defy ministerial oversight.

No doubt, this executive recklessness has left an indelible stain on Buhari’s increasingly tainted administration. Allegations that the war is selective and vindictive are gaining traction by the day. It is disconcerting to watch how this government has been lurching from shambles to debacle. Indeed, the unfolding scandals involving Abdulrasheed Maina, and the former Secretary to the Government of the Federation, Babachir Lawal, as well as the intrigues of the Attorney-General, some security chiefs and aides have tarnished Buhari’s once sparkling image.

All things considered, the government has acted irresponsibly: instead of raising the bar to reach for global best practices, the Presidency has descended to a primitive form of arbitrary governance. The promise of change from the culture of graft and abuse of due process of the Goodluck Jonathan era has dissolved into a cauldron of incompetence and exclusivity. The recklessness and impunity by the Buhari government is quite troubling. Where the interests of the commonwealth matter and standards of public service transcend greed, the parliament would have been up-in-arms; alas, the House of Representatives, impetuous and retrogressive as ever, had earlier weighed in on the side of a public official facing corruption allegations.

This disturbing trend in Buhari’s administration has to end. His provincial approach to governance is corroding the fabric of the union; he should step back and run a more inclusive and responsive government. Yusuf has no business at the NHIS until he has been cleared of all allegations by the ministerial probe panel and the anti-graft agencies. Institutions should be allowed to work free of interference; they should not be undermined by whimsical presidential indiscretions.

Buhari should reverse himself and allow due process to run its course. As for Adewole, he should make his case and politely request that Buhari rescind this untidy recall. When the man who calls you up for national service begins to undermine you, it may be the best time to quit with your integrity intact.

So Bob Dylan won the Nobel Prize for literature, who cares?

I love Bob Dylan……and Joan Baez. Meaning, message and melody unite in them

Ikhide

bob-dylanThe world has not rested since the 2016 Nobel Prize was awarded, not to Ngugi wa Thiong’o, but to Bob Dylan, that legendary poet who also sings. There have been impassioned essays for and against the award to Dylan. It all makes for fascinating reading.  Take this piece from Rajeev Balasubramanyam, writing in the Washington Post (October 22, 2016) who makes an interesting case for why Ngugi should have won the prize:

Ngugi’s decision to move away from English was a brave one for a writer hailing from Africa, a continent frequently treated as irrelevant by the rest of the world. It could, in fact, have led to his disappearance from the global stage, but instead it solidified his reputation as a writer of supreme political commitment, though few of his contemporaries or juniors took up the call to write in their native languages. Ngugi’s attitude toward this, however, is…

View original post 1,297 more words


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